obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Oldest Living Major League Baseball Player
Conrado “Connie” Marrero played all of five seasons of major league baseball. Pitching for the woeful Washington Senators, Mr. Marrero compiled a 39-40 career won-loss record, but earned a spot on the 1951 American League All-Star team and even a 1952 MVP vote.
Unusual for baseball, Mr. Marrero was a 39-year-old rookie in 1950 having coming up from the Havana Cubans where he won the Florida International League MVP going 25-8 and pitching a league-record 44 scoreless innings.
He was proud of his rural upbringing and was nicknamed “El Guajiro de Laberinto,” “The Peasant from Leberinto” during his years playing in Cuban amateur and professional leagues. Squat, stading at only five feet, five inches tall and weighing 158 pounds, Mr. Marrero was known for his mix of sliders and curves.
Mr. Marrero’s major league career ended after the 1954 season when he was the oldest active player at age 43. He returned to Cuba where he managed the Havana Sugar Kings of the Cuban League. When Fidel Castro took control in 1959, Mr. Marrero remained in Cuba and lived out the remainder of his life there. 
In 1999 when the Baltimore Orioles came to Cuba for an exhibition series against the Cuban national team, Mr. Marrero threw out the first pitch. 
Conrado Marrero died on April 23, 2014 at the age of 102 - two days shy of his 103rd birthday. Upon Mr. Marrero’s death, veteran infielder Mike Sandlock is now the oldest living ex-major leaguer at 98.
Sources: CBSSports.com, Wikipedia, and Baseball-Reference.com
(Image 1953 Topps card of Conrado “Connie” Marrero is copyright of Topps, Inc. and courtesy of goldenagebaseballcards.com)

Conrado “Connie” Marrero

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Oldest Living Major League Baseball Player

Conrado “Connie” Marrero played all of five seasons of major league baseball. Pitching for the woeful Washington Senators, Mr. Marrero compiled a 39-40 career won-loss record, but earned a spot on the 1951 American League All-Star team and even a 1952 MVP vote.

Unusual for baseball, Mr. Marrero was a 39-year-old rookie in 1950 having coming up from the Havana Cubans where he won the Florida International League MVP going 25-8 and pitching a league-record 44 scoreless innings.

He was proud of his rural upbringing and was nicknamed “El Guajiro de Laberinto,” “The Peasant from Leberinto” during his years playing in Cuban amateur and professional leagues. Squat, stading at only five feet, five inches tall and weighing 158 pounds, Mr. Marrero was known for his mix of sliders and curves.

Mr. Marrero’s major league career ended after the 1954 season when he was the oldest active player at age 43. He returned to Cuba where he managed the Havana Sugar Kings of the Cuban League. When Fidel Castro took control in 1959, Mr. Marrero remained in Cuba and lived out the remainder of his life there. 

In 1999 when the Baltimore Orioles came to Cuba for an exhibition series against the Cuban national team, Mr. Marrero threw out the first pitch. 

Conrado Marrero died on April 23, 2014 at the age of 102 - two days shy of his 103rd birthday. Upon Mr. Marrero’s death, veteran infielder Mike Sandlock is now the oldest living ex-major leaguer at 98.

Sources: CBSSports.com, Wikipedia, and Baseball-Reference.com

(Image 1953 Topps card of Conrado “Connie” Marrero is copyright of Topps, Inc. and courtesy of goldenagebaseballcards.com)

Conrado “Connie” Marrero

(Reblogged from obitoftheday)

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

Wrigley Field

Inside Wrigley Field’s scoreboard

April 10, 2014

Chicago, Illinois

Photos by Kiichiro Sato/AP

mightyflynn

(Reblogged from mightyflynn)

mightyflynn:

Jake: How are you gonna get the band back together, Mr. Hot Rodder? Those cops have your name, your address…

Elwood: They don’t have my address. I falsified my renewal. I put down 1060 West Addison.

Jake: 1060 West Addison? That’s Wrigley Field.

(from The Blues Brothers, 1980, image via Indy Props)

(Reblogged from mightyflynn)

George Van Haltren (1866-1945), aka “Rip”: Centerfielder, pitcher, and shortstop; career ran from 1887-1909; played with the Giants, Orioles, White Stockings, Pirates, Ward’s Wonders. Named readers’ favorite player from New York and Brooklyn in 1894 poll conducted by the New York Mercury.

Photo: William M. Vander Weyde via George Eastman House Collection

Text: via Slate dot com

Weeghman Park Left Field Bleachers [Now Wrigley Field]
"There are wonderful comfortable seats,/ like a beautiful lawn you’re lying on." Kai, Movie Theaters
Photo: Chicago Daily News

Weeghman Park Left Field Bleachers [Now Wrigley Field]

"There are wonderful comfortable seats,/ like a beautiful lawn you’re lying on." Kai, Movie Theaters

Photo: Chicago Daily News

beisbolero:

Great sketch about Vin Scully and his Tools of the Trade, by Sharon Henry, posted at Orange County Register

(Reblogged from beisbolero)

vintagesportspictures:

Orestes Minoso, Larry Doby and Roy Welmaker (1949)

(Reblogged from vintagesportspictures)

On my nightstand.

Toby Harrah (Topps 1978) and Franny And Zooey (1961) by J.D. Salinger

(submitted by JuniusWorth

baseballcardbookmarks

(Reblogged from baseballcardbookmarks)